Museum Week Events 2018

To celebrate our fortieth birthday and as part of Bath Museums Week (formerly Heritage Open Week) 27 October to 4 November 2018, the Museum of Bath at Work is showing a series of vintage films that range from textiles to ghosts. Admission to the film shows is free to all, while Bath and North East Somerset residents with a valid Discovery Card or other evidence of residency will also get free entry to the museum in Museum Week. 🎦

Monday October 29th

11.00 a.m. Free Admission

 

Making!

Museum week film-Colour in Clay

Two documentary films from the 1940s made in colour – Good Value (1942) and Colour in Clay (1944) concerned with mass production during wartime.

 

Tuesday October 30th

11.00 a.m. Free Admission

Textiles!

Museum week film -Queen Cotton

Two short documentaries –Queen Cotton (1946) and King Wool (1944) focussing on the textile industry during wartime.

 

Wednesday October 31st

11.00 a.m. Free Admission

Women at Work

Museum week film-Women at Work

Two documentary films – Women at War (1943) and Student Nurse (1949) celebrating women’s contribution to the war effort and the nascent National Health Service.

Wednesday October 31st

7.30 p.m. Free Admission

Ghost Story (1974)

Museum week film-Ghost Story

Creepy ghost story, perfect for Hallowe’en night viewing. Curious film, made in India pretending to be Sussex and featuring Marianne Faithful and Penelope Keith amongst others! Certificate 15

Thursday November 1st

11.00 a.m. Free Admission

On Common Ground

Museum week film-On Common Ground

Showing of a rare film ‘On Common Ground’ about ground breaking environmental and local history charity Common Ground. The work of this charity has informed much of the museum’s local history engagement agenda. Followed by a discussion on local history led by Museum Director Stuart Burroughs.

Friday November 2nd

11.00 a.m. Free Admission

Child’s Play

Museum week film-Child's Play

Two documentary films about children in post-war Britain – Child’s Play (1950) and Learning to Live (1952). Brilliant viewing for young and old.

 

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